Interational Center
E A S I
FSFE  
Example projects  
Structure  
Georg Greve  
ECIS  
FSD  
Free software  
FSF  
DFSG  
FSM  
GNU GPL  
E-learning  
Technology Issues  
Distance education  
LMS  
WAI  
WCAG  
Web accessibility  
Learning disability  
SLD  
Intelligence quotient  
IQ and the brain  
Study software  
 

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)
For more details on this topic, see Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 (known as WCAG) were published as a W3C Recommendation on 5 May 1999. A supporting document, Techniques for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 was published as a W3C Note on 6 November 2000. WCAG 1.0 is a set of guidelines for making web content more accessible to persons with disabilities. They also help make web content more usable for other devices, including mobile devices (PDAs and cell phones). The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 are recognized as a de facto standard and have served as a basis for legislation and evaluation methodologies in many countries.

The WCAG working group published WCAG 2.0 as a Recommendation on 11 December 2008. WCAG 2.0 is based on very different requirements from WCAG 1.0:

- the guidelines needed to be technology-neutral, whereas WCAG 1.0 was strongly based on HTML and CSS;
- the guidelines needed to be worded as testable statements instead of instructions to authors.

The combination of more general applicability and higher precision proved very challenging.

Authoring Tools Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG)

Developed by the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines Working Group, the ATAG 1.0 became a W3C Recommendation on 3 February 3 2000. The ATAG is a set of guidelines for developers of any kind of authoring tool for Web content: simple HTML editors, tools that export content for use on the Web (for example, word processors that can save as HTML), tools that produce multimedia, content management systems, etcetera.

The goal is for developers to create tools that:

- are accessible to authors regardless of disability,
- produce accessible content by default,
- support and encourage authors to create accessible content.

The ATAG working group is currently working on a second version of the guidelines. A Last Call Working Draft was published in November 2004 but subsequent versions were published as normal working drafts. Implementation Techniques for ATAG 2.0 are also available as a working draft.

User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG)

Developed by the User Agent Accessibility Guidelines Working Group, the UAAG 1.0 became a W3C Recommendation on 17 December 2002. The UAAG is a set of guidelines for user agent developers (such as web browsers and media players) aimed at making the user agent accessible to users with disabilities. Techniques for User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 was published as a W3C Note on the same day; it provides techniques for satisfying the checkpoints defined in UAAG 1.0. Working group members also produced other supporting documents, including initial notes on How to evaluate a user agent for conformance to UAAG 1.0; this document was not formally approved by the working group. No user agents have been reported as fully conforming to UAAG 1.0.

The working group is currently working on a new version of the guidelines. The first public draft of User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 was published on 12 March 2008.

 


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